RGS_library

bookpatrol:

A beautiful bookshop in Brazil

The people of Brazil have something else to cheer about in addition the recent World Cup festivities. Check out the Livraria Cultura bookshop in São Paulo designed by Studio MK-27.

The goal was to create a bookshop that doubled as a meeting place and as these images attest they seem to have done a fine job. The open well-light floor plan allows for a comfortable shopping experience as well as encouraging customers to hang around and enjoy the space.

All photos by Fernando Guerra I FG+SG

More images and background at ArchDaily: Cultura Bookstore / Studio MK27

diversityinya:

Notable Novels for Teens About the Arab World

By Elsa Marston

Abdel-Fattah, Randa. Where the Streets Had a Name (Scholastic 2010). Palestine, MG/YA. On a secret mission of mercy, a girl makes her way—strictly forbidden without permission from Israeli authorities—from her village into Jerusalem. [Also see this author’s books about Arab immigrants in Australia: Does My Head Look Big in This? andTen things I Hate About Me. Both have appealing teen voice.]

Al-Maria, Sophia. The Girl Who Fell to Earth (Harper Perennial 2012). Arabian Peninsula and Egypt, YA. The daughter of a mixed marriage spends time with her father’s family in a Gulf State, tries to reconcile her two radically different heritages.

Barakat, Ibtisam. Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood (Kroupa/Farrar Straus Giroux 2007). Palestine, MG/YA. Memoir of a young girl set in a time of war and displacement, but revealing solid family experience.

Carmi, Daniella. Samir and Yonatan (Levine/Scholastic 2000). Israel/Palestinians, MG/YA. A Palestinian boy being treated in an Israeli hospital relates to the children and medical staff.

Carter, Anne Laurel. The Shepherd’s Granddaughter (Groundwood 2008). Palestine, MG/YA. In a rural village under attack from a nearby Israeli settlement, a young teenaged girl starts to broaden her horizons.

Clinton, Cathryn. A Stone in My Hand (Candlewick 2002). Palestine, MG/YA. During an outbreak of violence, a young girl in Gaza copes with loss: her father’s death and her brother’s participation in the insurrection.

Laird, Elizabeth. A Little Piece of Ground (Haymarket 2006; originally Macmillan UK 2003). Palestine, MG/YA. A boy defies Israeli-imposed curfew in his efforts to claim a place to play soccer.

Nye, Naomi Shihab. Habibi (Simon & Schuster 1997). Palestine, MG/YA. An Arab-American girl visits her father’s natal village in Palestine, under occupation, and absorbs experiences both exhilarating and distressing.

Marsden, Carolyn. The White Zone (CarolRhoda 2012). Iraq, MG. Two boy cousins cope with the sectarian strife that separates them during the fighting in Baghdad.

Marston, Elsa. Santa Claus in Baghdad and Other Stories About Teens in the Arab World (Indiana University Press 2008). Several countries, MG/YA. Young teens in eight contrasting Arab societies face universal challenges of adolescence; the most adult story in subject matter is “Honor” (Jordan).

Perera, Anna. The Glass Collector (Whitman 2011). Egypt, YA. Valuable chiefly because of its setting in the “trash-collectors community” in Cairo.

* * *

elsamarston

With an M.A. in international affairs from Harvard University in hand, Elsa Marston attended the American University of Beirut on a Rotary Foundation Fellowship. Sojourns in different countries, especially Lebanon, Egypt, and Tunisia, have helped inspire Elsa’a work as a children’s/YA author and specialist in literature about the region. Her most recent books are a YA biography of a remarkable Arab hero, The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria (Wisdom Tales 2013), and Santa Claus in Baghdad and Other Stories About Teens in the Arab World (Indiana University Press, 2008), a collection of stories set in different Arab societies, focusing on growing-up experiences that young Americans can relate to. A picture book about post-civil war Lebanon, The Olive Tree, is forthcoming in 2014.  Her website is www.elsamarston.com.

torbooks:

What’s your favorite opening line?

torbooks:

What’s your favorite opening line?

nypl:

Great words of advice on the anniversary of To Kill a Mockingbird’s publishing. 

nypl:

Great words of advice on the anniversary of To Kill a Mockingbird’s publishing

thebooker:

literatureloveaffair:

There have been an alarming number of posts linking to pirated copies of books floating around lately, so I thought it’d be productive to share some of my own legal ways of accessing books instead of fighting the posts themselves.
If you would like to know more about book piracy and discussions surrounding the issue, here are some links:
25 thoughts on book piracy
Book piracy - an insiders perspective 
Why I stopped pirating and started paying for media 
The ethics of internet piracy 
The real problem with piracy 
Piracy is yesterday’s worry for today’s ‘artisan authors’
Kindle e-book piracy accelerates
John Green: Why libraries are different from piracy
Across the digital divide
Now on to some free books!
Libraries 
Libraries are wonderful. A collection of books that people want you to take home and read. What could be better?
If they don’t have a book you want, have a chat to the librarians. They are usually all very helpful and would love to hear suggestions of books, and even get the book you want in stock for you. 
Library cards are a wonderful resource, but depending on your library you may need a permanent address - if you can’t supply this that’s fine! You don’t need a library card to use libraries. Go in, grab a book, read for a while. 
Many libraries now have e-book borrowing services available. It is well worth checking whether your library offers this if you prefer reading e-books or even listening to audiobooks. 
Overdrive is a marvelous program that partners with many libraries to provide e-book lending, check the site to see whether any libraries near you participate!
Classics
Books in the public domain can be accessed for free in many formats 
Project Gutenberg offers a huge selection of public domain books in html, epub, kindle, and plain text format. 
Books in the public domain can also be found directly through the Kindle or Kobo stores. Both stores offer free apps for mobile devices and computers. 
LibriVox has an impressive collection of audiobooks of public domain books read by volunteers.
Misc. 
PulseIt features different young adult books every week that you can read online for free. 
If you enjoy reviewing, recommending, or blogging about books you might want to check out some sites offering review copies e-book copies of books. I personally use Netgalley. I’ve also heard good things about Edelweiss. 
Giveaways are another way to source free books, even if there is no guarantee of winning, what’s the harm in trying? Goodreads has a staggering number of book giveaways all the time, and there are always a few circulating in the Tumblr book community.
Kindle and Kobo also offer free or heavily discounted books often, so it is well worth checking them every so often to see if any of the free books catch your eye. 
These are the only completely free and legal ways to source books that I know of - feel free to add your own ideas. 
Go forth and read responsibly!

This post is amazing!

thebooker:

literatureloveaffair:

There have been an alarming number of posts linking to pirated copies of books floating around lately, so I thought it’d be productive to share some of my own legal ways of accessing books instead of fighting the posts themselves.

If you would like to know more about book piracy and discussions surrounding the issue, here are some links:

Now on to some free books!

Libraries 

  • Libraries are wonderful. A collection of books that people want you to take home and read. What could be better?
  • If they don’t have a book you want, have a chat to the librarians. They are usually all very helpful and would love to hear suggestions of books, and even get the book you want in stock for you. 
  • Library cards are a wonderful resource, but depending on your library you may need a permanent address - if you can’t supply this that’s fine! You don’t need a library card to use libraries. Go in, grab a book, read for a while. 
  • Many libraries now have e-book borrowing services available. It is well worth checking whether your library offers this if you prefer reading e-books or even listening to audiobooks. 
  • Overdrive is a marvelous program that partners with many libraries to provide e-book lending, check the site to see whether any libraries near you participate!

Classics

  • Books in the public domain can be accessed for free in many formats 
  • Project Gutenberg offers a huge selection of public domain books in html, epub, kindle, and plain text format. 
  • Books in the public domain can also be found directly through the Kindle or Kobo stores. Both stores offer free apps for mobile devices and computers. 
  • LibriVox has an impressive collection of audiobooks of public domain books read by volunteers.

Misc. 

  • PulseIt features different young adult books every week that you can read online for free. 
  • If you enjoy reviewing, recommending, or blogging about books you might want to check out some sites offering review copies e-book copies of books. I personally use Netgalley. I’ve also heard good things about Edelweiss
  • Giveaways are another way to source free books, even if there is no guarantee of winning, what’s the harm in trying? Goodreads has a staggering number of book giveaways all the time, and there are always a few circulating in the Tumblr book community.
  • Kindle and Kobo also offer free or heavily discounted books often, so it is well worth checking them every so often to see if any of the free books catch your eye. 

These are the only completely free and legal ways to source books that I know of - feel free to add your own ideas. 

Go forth and read responsibly!

This post is amazing!

yainterrobang:

LIST OF THE WEEK: TEN HIGH FANTASY NOVELS
Lose yourself in these worlds most fantastical. For more fun lists and all things YA lit, visit our website, follow us here and on Twitter, and subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

quoted-books:

imirish143 said: Hi! I’m really a sucker for books that is about true love.. Like Anna and The French Kiss, Just One Day, Maybe Someday, The Fault In Our Stars and Dear John… Can you suggest me more of those? I’m fond of discovering more because of your blog :) thank you in advance! :)
We should start a club. Because I also am a sucker for those kind of books you suggested. I don’t quite know what it is, but something about them always tugs on my heart strings. It is possible that I might be a hopeless romantic. Of all the books I have read, these are the first ones that come to my mind:
1. The Last Summer of You (& Me) by Ann Brashares
2. Going Too Far by Jennifer Echols
3. Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella
4. The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith
5. Cross My Heart by Carly Phillips
6. The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen
Thanks for question!
Recommendation by myrandomnessinlife

quoted-books:

imirish143 said: Hi! I’m really a sucker for books that is about true love.. Like Anna and The French Kiss, Just One Day, Maybe Someday, The Fault In Our Stars and Dear John… Can you suggest me more of those? I’m fond of discovering more because of your blog :) thank you in advance! :)

We should start a club. Because I also am a sucker for those kind of books you suggested. I don’t quite know what it is, but something about them always tugs on my heart strings. It is possible that I might be a hopeless romantic. Of all the books I have read, these are the first ones that come to my mind:

1. The Last Summer of You (& Me) by Ann Brashares

2. Going Too Far by Jennifer Echols

3. Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

4. The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith

5. Cross My Heart by Carly Phillips

6. The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen

Thanks for question!

Recommendation by myrandomnessinlife